About the Conference

Once regarded as sources of environmental degradation, cities are now widely recognized as part of the solution to living within “planetary boundaries.” But what makes a sustainable city? How can cities function in a way that enables residents to enjoy urban life to the fullest without imposing unreasonable burdens on limited resources?

The Smart and Sustainable Cities Conference will provide a forum for the exchange of knowledge and experience between the US - especially California - and Israel, which share many of the same environmental challenges. With a focus on “what’s new,” leading academics and practitioners from both countries will present the most innovative models for urban sustainability. They will address the policy, design and technology experiments being implemented today; consider what holds the most promise; and propose future directions for city management and development to move us toward a more sustainable future.

Panel sessions will cover the key areas of energy, water, transportation, the built environment (sustainable architecture, affordable housing and public spaces), and the digital city & sharing economy, exploring the evolving values and lifestyles made possible by digital communications.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti will give the keynote address and discuss LA's Sustainable Cities pLAn.  

A concluding panel - Creating the Sustainable City: Innovation, Politics & Social Change - will pull together key ideas from the preceding panels and discuss “how to make it happen”: the new forms of organization and citizen involvement that may be needed for the innovative technologies and policies to take hold.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?

Environmental researchers, professionals from industry and non-profit organizations, government officials, educators, students, and members of the general public who wish to learn about the latest developments in urban sustainability.

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Conference Schedule

(Click on the panel title to view the speakers for that panel)

7:45 – 8:30 AM Registration and continental breakfast

8:30 – 8:40 AM Welcome & Introductory Remarks

8:40 – 9:50 AM Panel I – Transportation

9:55 – 11:00 AM Panel II – Energy

11:00 -11:15 AM Coffee Break 

11:15 – 12:25 PM Panel III – Water

12:30 – 1:25 PM Lunch

1:30 – 2:00 PM Keynote Address – Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

2:05 – 3:15 PM Panel IV – Built Environment

3:15 – 3:30 PM Coffee Break

3:30 – 4:40 PM Panel V – The Digital City & Sharing Economy

4:40 – 5:50 PM Closing Panel - Creating the “Sustainable City”: Innovation, Politics & Social Change

5:50 – 6:00 PM Thank you and conclusion

Panel I - Transportation

Panelists

 

  • Eran Feitelson, Hebrew University
  • Robert Cervero, UC Berkeley
  • Mikhail Chester, Arizona State
  • Panel Chair: Martin Wachs, UCLA

 

 

Panel II - Energy

Panelists

 

  • Mary Leslie, Los Angeles Business Council
  • Evyatar Erell, Ben Gurion University
  • Rajit Gadh, UCLA
  • Panel Chair: JR DeShazo, UCLA

 

 

Panel III - Water

Panelists

 

  • Uri Shamir, Technion
  • Nancy Sutley, L.A. Department of Water & Power
  • Yoram Cohen, UCLA
  • Panel Chair: Mark Gold, UCLA

 

 

Eric Garcetti

Mayor of the City of Los Angeles

Garcetti was elected four times by his peers to serve as President of the Los Angeles City Council from 2006 to 2012. From 2001 until taking office as Mayor, he served as the Councilmember representing the 13th District, which includes Hollywood, Echo Park, Silver Lake, and Atwater Village-all of which were dramatically revitalized under Garcetti's leadership.

Garcetti created the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and on April 8, 2015, released L.A.’s first-ever Sustainable City pLAn. The pLAn is both a roadmap to achieve back to basics short-term results while setting the path to strengthen and transform our City in the decades to come. This pLAn sets the course for a cleaner environment and a stronger economy, with a commitment to equity as its foundation. The pLAn is made up of short term (by 2017) and longer term (by 2025 and 2035) targets in 14 categories that will advance our environment, economy and equity.

Garcetti was raised in the San Fernando Valley and earned his B.A. and M.A. from Columbia University. He studied as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford and the London School of Economics and taught at Occidental College and USC. A fourth generation Angeleno, he and his wife, Amy Elaine Wakeland, have a young daughter. He is a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy reserve and is an avid jazz pianist and photographer.

 

 

Panel IV - Built Environment

Panelists

 

  • Tamar Gavrieli, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies
  • Dana Cuff, UCLA
  • Stuart Gabriel, UCLA
  • Panel Chair: Walker Wells, Global Green USA

 

 

Panel V - The Digital City & Sharing Economy

Panelists

 

  • Sheizaf Rafaeli, Haifa University
  • Peter Marx, City of L.A. CTO
  • Charles Steinfield, Michigan State
  • Panel Chair: Valerie Brachya, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies

 

 

Closing Panel

Panelists

 

  • Valerie Brachya, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies
  • Thomas Princen, University of Michigan
  • Robert Krueger, Worchester Polytechnic Institute
  • Panel Chair: Stephanie Pincetl, UCLA

 

 

Speakers

Eric Garcetti

Mayor of the City of Los Angeles.

Garcetti was elected four times by his peers to serve as President of the Los Angeles City Council from 2006 to 2012. From 2001 until taking office as Mayor, he served as the Councilmember representing the 13th District which includes Hollywood, Echo Park, Silver Lake, and Atwater Village -- all of which were dramatically revitalized under Garcetti's leadership. Garcetti created the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability and on April 8, 2015, released L.A.’s first-ever Sustainable City pLAn. The pLAn is both a roadmap to achieve back to basics short-term results while setting the path to strengthen and transform our City in the decades to come. This pLAn sets the course for a cleaner environment and a stronger economy, with a commitment to equity as its foundation. The pLAn is made up of short term (by 2017) and longer term (by 2025 and 2035) targets in 14 categories that will advance our environment, economy and equity. Garcetti was raised in the San Fernando Valley and earned his B.A. and M.A. from Columbia University. He studied as a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford and the London School of Economics and taught at Occidental College and USC. A fourth generation Angeleno, he and his wife, Amy Elaine Wakeland, have a young daughter. He is a Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy reserve and is an avid jazz pianist and photographer.

 

Valerie Brachya

Lecturer on Sustainability and Environmental Planning at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and at Tel Aviv University. Former Senior Director General for Policy and Planning of the Ministry of Environmental Protection, Israel.

Ms Brachya initiated environmental planning in government in Israel and was a member of the National Board for Planning and Building and many national level planning committees . She promoted sustainable development following the Rio Global Summit and led the governmental process for a sustainability strategy following the Johannesburg Global Summit. Her international responsibilities included leading the environmental section during Israel’s accession to the OECD, representing Israel at UNEP and other UN forums on environmental issues and leading or participating in the environmental aspects of bilateral or international negotiations concerning the Middle East. She was awarded the ‘Green Globe’ of the civil society environmental forum and was honored by the Israel Planning Association . On retirement from Government, Ms Brachya joined the Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies, promoting a range of research studies on environmental policy, the flagship project of which was the initiation and management of a multi disciplinary team who prepared a Sustainability Outlook for Israel 2030 (kayamut2030.org). She is currently the academic advisor of the multi disciplinary team for a research project on Urban Sustainability at the Institute.

 

Robert Cervero, Ph.D.

Friesen Chair of Urban Studies and Chair, City and Regional Planning, College of Environmental Design and Director, University of California Transportation Center (UCTC), UC Berkeley

Professor Cervero works in the area of sustainable transportation policy and planning, focusing on the nexus between urban transportation and land-use systems. He is Friesen Chair of Urban Studies as well as Director of the University of California Transportation Center (UCTC), a multi-campus research center devoted to advancing economic competitiveness, sustainability and livability in the transportation sector. His current research focuses on the intersection of infrastructure, place-making, and economic development, integration of BRT and hybrid services, bikeway network performance, and sustainable transportation policies for the Global South. Professor Cervero has and continues to serve as an advisor and consultant on numerous transportation and urban planning projects worldwide. In 2013, he was ranked among the top 100 City Innovators Worldwide by UMB’s Futures Cities. He chairs the International Association of Urban Environments and the National Advisory Board of the Active Living Research Program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and serves on the advisory board of the Future of Urban Development Initiative of the World Economic Forum, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Board of Scientific Counselors, and the American Planning Association’s Emerging Issues Task Force. He was a contributing author to the recent IPCC (International Panel on Climate Change) Fifth Assessment and UN-Habitat’s 2013 Global Report on Sustainable Mobility. He serves on the editorial boards of 8 academic journals, including Urban Studies and Journal of the American Planning Association.

 

Mikhail Chester, Ph.D.

Senior Sustainability Scientist, Julie Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability; Assistant Professor, School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, Arizona State University

An infrastructure energy and environment scientist, Mikhail Chester manages a research laboratory in Arizona State University's (ASU) Civil, Environmental, and Sustainable Engineering program. His research has focused on transportation systems and cities, evaluating life-cycle and supply chain effects and their associated human and environmental impacts. Chester's research expands the assessment boundaries of complex systems to understand comprehensive effects of policies and decisions, including infrastructure interdependencies. He focuses largely on transportation and cities and he and his team develop innovative life-cycle assessment thinking for sustainable infrastructure challenges. Their research includes the development of integrated transportation and land use sustainability frameworks, urban growth models and how infrastructure enables behaviors, transportation environmental life cycle assessment frameworks, and methods for improving vulnerability in a climate-constrained future. He serves as the director of the Transportation Life Cycle Assessment Network and the ASU Urban Sustainability Laboratory; he also serves as the co-director of the Urban Resilience Extreme Events Sustainability Research Network.

 

Yoram Cohen, Ph.D.

Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, UCLA Luskin Scholar, Director or UCLA Water Technology Research Center (WaTeR), UCLA

Dr. Yoram Cohen is a UCLA Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. He holds a B.S. and M.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Toronto (1975, 1977), and a PhD from the University of Delaware (1981). He is on the faculty of the UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, a UCLA Luskin Scholar, Director of UCLA Water Technology Research (WaTeR), and a member and Theme Leader at the UCLA Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN). He is also a co-founding member of the UCLA/National Science Foundation (NSF) Center for the Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (CEIN), which received the 2012 California Governor's Award in Green Chemistry. He is a recognized expert in water purification and desalination, membrane separation processes, and environmental impact assessment, with over 225 published research papers and book chapters in the above areas. Born in Israel, Dr. Cohen maintains close ties to the country both in his personal and professional lives. He is an Adjunct Professor at Ben-Gurion University and was a Visiting Professor at the Technion from 1987-1988. Dr. Cohen visits Israel frequently and is bringing extensive experience to the Nazarian Center.

Dana Cuff, Ph.D.

Professor of Architecture/Urban Design and Urban Planning, UCLA

Dr. Cuff holds her primary appointment in the Department of Architecture and a joint appointment in Urban Planning. She is the founding director of cityLAB, a research center at UCLA that explores the challenges facing the 21st century metropolis through design and research. Cuff's work focuses on urban design, affordable housing, modernism, urban sensing technologies, and the politics of place. She has published widely on these topics, including the books Fast Forward Urbanism (edited with Roger Sherman, Princeton Architectural 2011) and The Provisional City (MIT 2000), a project supported by both the Getty and the National Endowment for the Arts. Through cityLAB, Cuff has expanded her studies of infrastructure, postsuburban Los Angeles, and new formulations of green design, most recently through funded research about the urban design implications of proposed high speed rail. She organized the design ideas competition called WPA 2.0: Working Public Architecture which attracted 400 submissions from students and design professionals around the world in 2009. Dr. Cuff teaches various courses related to the profession of architecture as well as special seminars on cultural issues, architectural theory, and urbanism.

J.R. DeShazo, Ph.D.

Professor of Public Policy, Urban Planning, and Civil and Environmental Engineering, and Director, Luskin Center for Innovation, Luskin School of Public Policy, UCLA

J.R. DeShazo is the Director of the Luskin Center for Innovation at the University of California at Los Angeles. He is also Professor and Vice Chair of the Department of Public Policy in the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA, where he is an expert in economics, public finance, and organizational governance. He was the Director of the Ralph and Goldy Lewis Center for Regional Policy Studies at UCLA for 5 years (2004-2011). Dr. DeShazo’s recent research has focused on local public finance, regulatory reform, climate change policy, and solar energy policy. He advises the Los Angeles City Council, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, the Metropolitan Water District, and the Los Angeles Planning Department, among key agencies. His work also supports the California Air Resources Board and the Southern California Association in their effort to implement AB 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act, and its complementary SB 375, transportation and land use bill. Dr. DeShazo has previously advised the US Environmental Protection Agency, United Nations, UNEP, the World Bank, the European Union, and many other governmental agencies and NGO’s. He holds a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from Harvard University and a M.Sc. in Economics from Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

 

Evyatar Erell, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, The Jacob Blaustein Institute for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Professor Erell is an architect and researcher in the field of climate and energy in the built environment. He received a professional architecture degree from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, a Master's degree in Geography & Environmental Development at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, and a PhD in Architecture from the University of Adelaide. In addition to teaching, architectural design and consulting, he is involved in experimental and inter-disciplinary research, and has published on a range of topics, including bioclimatic design of buildings, focusing on glazing systems and daylight control; passive and low-energy technologies for climatization of buildings; Urban microclimate and the design of spaces between buildings, in particular modeling the effect of urban form on energy consumption of buildings and the effects of vegetation in arid locations. Professor Erell is co-author of several books, including a design handbook on 'Roof Cooling Techniques' and, more recently, 'Urban Microclimate – The Design of Spaces between Buildings. He is a member of several expert committees at the Israel Institute of Standards, and has contributed to drafting national standards for thermal insulation and energy certification of buildings.

 

Eran Feitelson, Ph.D.

Professor of Geography, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Eran Feitelson is a Professor at the Department of Geography of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is currently head of the Advanced School for Environmental Studies. He was previously head of the Federmann School for Public Policy and Government (2004-9) and head of the Department of Geography (2003-4). He holds an MA in geography and economics from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and a Ph.D from the Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering at the Johns Hopkins University. He has published 100 articles in refereed journal and edited volumes on water policy issues, transport policy, environmental policy, and environmental planning. His research focused on trans-boundary water issues in the Israeli-Arab context, transport and environment policies and land and planning policies and politics. Recently he has worked on the political and economic facets of large scale seawater desalination, on the definitions of water needs, on the formulation of policy packages, equity facets of transport and the politics of land and land use planning in Israel. In addition to his academic work Eran Feitelson has participated in several national planning teams in Israel and has been a member of many national committees. He is also serving on the National Parks and Nature Reserves Commission, which he chaired for ten years (1999-2009). He was a Visiting Senior Researcher at Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, Indiana University (1997/8), a non-resident Visiting Fellow at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas (2007-11) and a Visiting Professor in the School of Geography and Environment at the University of Oxford (2009-10).

 

Stuart A. Gabriel, Ph.D.

Arden Realty Chair, Professor of Finance and Director, Ziman Center for Real Estate at the Anderson School of Management, UCLA

Professor Gabriel’s research focuses on topics of real estate finance and economics, housing and mortgage markets, urban and regional economics, and macroeconomics. He previously served on the economics staff of the Federal Reserve Board in Washington, D.C. and as a Visiting Scholar at the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco. He also serves, on an ongoing basis, as a Visiting Professor at the Recanati Graduate School of Business, Tel Aviv University, and has expertise on housing issues in Israel. Professor Gabriel has published 75 articles in economics and finance journals and serves on the editorial boards of seven academic journals. His recent research has focused on issues of housing and the financial crisis, including assessment of integration and contagion in US housing markets, Google search behavior as an indicator of housing distress, GSE crowd out in secondary mortgage markets, and the effects of CDO market implosion on mortgage pricing. Dr. Gabriel is a past President of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association and a Fellow of the Homer Hoyt Institute for Advanced Real Estate Studies. Professor Gabriel serves on the Boards of Directors of KBS REITs and is a consultant to numerous corporate and governmental entities.

 

Rajit Gadh, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Dr. Rajit Gadh is Professor of the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science at UCLA, Founder and Director the Smart Grid Energy Research Center or SMERC (http://smartgrid.ucla.edu) and Founder and Director of the UCLA WINMEC Consortium (http://winmec.ucla.edu). Dr. Gadh has a Doctorate degree from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), a Masters from Cornell University and a Bachelors degree from IIT Kanpur all in engineering. He has taught as a visiting researcher at UC Berkeley, has been an Assistant, Associate and Full Professor at University of Wisconsin-Madison, and was a visiting researcher at Stanford University. He is a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has received the National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award, NSF Research Initiation Award, and, NSF-Lucent Industry Ecology Fellow Award, Society of Automotive Engineers Ralph R. Teetor Educational award, IEEE WTS second best student paper award, ASME Kodak Best Technical Paper award, AT&T Industrial ecology fellow award, Engineering Education Foundation Research Initiation Award, the William Mong Fellowship from University of Hong Kong, and other accolades in his career. He has lectured and given keynote/distinguished addresses worldwide in countries such as Belgium, Brazil, China, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Italy, Spain, Holland, Hong Kong, Japan, S. Korea, Singapore, Taiwan, and, Thailand. Dr. Gadh serves as advisor to a handful of technology-based startups.

 

Tamar Gavrieli

Director, Urban Sustainability Project, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies; former Director, Strategic Planning Unit, Tel Aviv Municipality

Tamar Gavrieli is an Urban Planner. She holds an MSc in Urban and Regional Planning from the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel, and a Masters degree from the Housing Program at the University of Minnesota, USA. Tamar dedicated 25 years to the City of Tel-Aviv Yaffo, and served as the Founding-Director of the Division for Strategic Planning for Tel-Aviv-Yaffo from 2000 until 2013. Over the past 30 years, Tamar has amassed extensive hands-on experience in strategic urban planning; drafting city strategic -plans and local master plan; preparing policy papers; directing strategic urban development; leading multi-disciplinary planning programs that involve community stakeholders; leading implementable research projects and policy studies; and collaborating with international planning teams.

 

Mark Gold, Ph.D.

Associate Vice Chancellor for Environment and Sustainability, Coastal Center Director, and Adjunct Professor, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA

Vice Chancellor Gold formerly led the environmental group Heal the Bay, serving for nearly 20 years as its executive director and President. Heal the Bay is an environmental group dedicated to making Southern California coastal waters and watersheds, including Santa Monica Bay, safe, healthy and clean. He has worked extensively for the last 25 years in the fields of coastal protection, water pollution, water supply, and urban sustainability. In particular he has worked on research projects on urban runoff pollution, DDT and PCB contamination in fish, and the health risks of swimming at runoff contaminated beaches. He created Heal the Bay's Beach Report Card, and has authored or co-authored numerous California coastal protection, water quality and environmental education bills. He served on the USEPA Urban Stormwater Federal Advisory Committee and was the vice chair of the California Ocean Science Trust and is vice chair of the National Estuary Program's Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission. Mark received his Bachelors and Masters in Biology and his doctorate in Environmental Science and Engineering from UCLA. He has been inducted into the UCLA School of Public Health Hall of Fame, and has received the James Irvine Foundation Leadership Award and the Aspen Institute Catto Fellowship.

 

Robert Krueger, Ph.D.

Associate Professor; Director, Environmental and Sustainability Studies, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Robert Krueger is the founding director of WPI's Environment and Sustainability Studies Program. He has been a Co-Principal Investigator on two U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants focused on environmental justice issues in Worcester. He serves as co-chair of the EPA’s Environmental Justice Working Group. He is also board president of the Regional Environmental Council. Abroad, international audiences recognize Krueger’s scholarship on urban sustainability. He has published dozens of papers in prestigious internationally peer-reviewed journals. He is co-editor of The Sustainable Development Paradox, published by Guilford Press, New York and London. Krueger spent the summer of 2011 in Luxembourg to assess the implementation of that country’s sustainable spatial planning policies. He sits of the editorial board of Local Environment: The international journal of justice and sustainability, Sustainability, and The Journal of Community Engagement. He serves on the executive committee of the Planning and Environment Research Group of the Royal Geographical Society.

 

Mary Leslie

President, Los Angeles Business Council

Mary Leslie is president of the Los Angeles Business Council (LABC), an advocacy and educational organization dedicated to serving local businesses while informing and impacting positive change at multiple layers of government. For more than 70 years, the LABC has been an influential link between business and government and has had a major impact on public policy issues related to education, housing and environmental sustainability. Under her leadership, the LABC has developed a national reputation as a catalyst for innovative policy in the fields of housing, transportation, renewable energy development, CleanTech and more. The LABC initiated and supported passage of Los Angeles’ first Green Building Ordinance and provided critical support for California’s multi-billion-dollar housing initiative, 1C. The LABC was responsible for helping qualify a billion-dollar city housing bond (Prop H) and creating the Los Angeles Unified School District’s Office of Civic Engagement. Ms. Leslie received her Bachelor’s degree from the University of Santa Clara, holds a Master’s degree in Public Administration from the University of Southern California, and attended the Executive Management Program at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. She serves on the Los Angeles Conservation Corporation Board of Directors and served as a Commissioner on the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Board and the Advisory Committees of L.A. Family Housing and the California Women’s Law Center.

 

Peter Marx

Chief Innovation Technology Officer, City of Los Angeles

LA's Mayor Garcetti appointed Peter Marx as the city's first Chief Innovation Technology Officer. A key part of Mayor Garcetti's back to basics agenda, Marx will oversee the implementation of new tools and technologies across L.A. city government better solve problems for residents and make City Hall work more efficiently and effectively. In addition, he will partner with L.A.'s growing tech industry to deploy innovative technology and promote local job creation. Before joining the Mayor's Office, Marx served as the Vice President of Business Development at Qualcomm Labs, Inc., commercializing a variety of emerging technologies. Previously, Marx was the Vice President of the Technology and Digital Studio at Mattel, Inc. where the company received a Webby award, the highest award for excellence in online content. Marx managed Analog Protocol, a media-technology consultancy; served as the Chief Technology Officer for Vivendi-Universal Games and Vice President of Emerging Technologies for Universal Studios; and held engineering and producer positions at Electronic Arts. Early in his career, he served as an engineer on a variety of telemedicine, digital video, radiological imaging, and biomedicine applications for UCLA and 3M Company.

 

Stephanie Pincetl, Ph.D.

Professor-in-Residence and Director, California Center for Sustainable Communities, Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, UCLA

Professor Pincetl conducts research on environmental policies and governance and analyzes how institutional rules construct how natural resources and energy are used to support human activities. She is expert in bringing together interdisciplinary teams of researchers across the biophysical and engineering sciences with the social sciences to address problems of complex urban systems and environmental management. Dr. Pincetl has written extensively about land use in California, environmental justice, habitat conservation efforts, water and energy policy. She has received funding from the National Science Foundation to conduct collaborative research with biophysical scientists on urban ecology and water management in Los Angeles, as well as from the California Energy Commission PIER program to develop a methodology to understand energy use in communities in California using urban metabolism methods coupled with social policy considerations. Her book, Transforming California, the Political History of Land Use in the State, is the definitive work on land use politics and policies of California. She is the leading author of the urban section of the Southwest Technical Report to the National Climate Assessment and a contributing author of the urban section of the National Climate Assessment. Dr. Pincetl teaches courses on land use and the environment, environmental policies and politics in the US, and sustainable cities. She spent 10 years working in the nonprofit environmental justice sector, and also taught in the Institut d'Etudes Politiques International Masters of Public Administration in Paris.

 

Thomas Princen, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan

Professor Princen studies issues of social and ecological sustainability with a primary focus on principles for sustainability, overconsumption and sufficiency, the language and ethics of resource use, localization and the transition out of fossil fuels. His current research projects include developing a “politics of urgent transition” to end the fossil fuel era; ethics of long-term ecological sustainability and decision-making, and the politics of sacrifice; localization; and sufficiency as a social organizing principal. He teaches and has published extensively on these issues. Selected books include The Localization Reader: Adapting to the Coming Downshift (De Young and Princen, MIT Press, 2012); Treading Softly: Paths to Ecological Order (MIT Press, 2010); The Logic of Sufficiency (MIT Press, 2005); Confronting Consumption (Princen, Maniates and Conca, eds. MIT Press, 2002); and Environmental NGOs in World Politics: Linking the Local and the Global (Princen and Finger, London: Routledge, 1994).

 

Sheizaf Rafaeli, Ph.D.

Professor, Graduate School of Management; Founding Director, Center for Internet Research, University of Haifa

Professor Rafaeli is Founding Director of the Center for Internet Research and former head of the Graduate School of Management (2005-2011) at the University of Haifa. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Computer Mediated Communication (JCMC), serves as director and member of numerous editorial boards, the board of LINKS (the national Center of Excellence on Learning in the Networked Society), and the Wikimedia Foundation board. His interests include Electronic Business, Information Studies, Computer Mediated Communication, Social Networks and their analysis, computer-mediated collaboration and Online Games and Simulations. Over the past twenty five years, he has taught courses on computers as media, and the social implications of new communication technologies, as well as numerous Information Systems' courses.

He has published widely in academic journals, and has also written extensively for the financial and business press, produced a radio lecture series on “The Computer, the Network and the Information Age,” and been involved in building internet-based activities such as online higher-education, journalism, political, governmental, social and economic virtual organizations and efforts. Profesor Rafaeli has served in visiting research and teaching positions at Ohio State University, Michigan State University, IBM, Stanford University, Technion, Israeli College of Management, and the University of Michigan.

 

Uri Shamir, Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Prof. Shamir's expertise is in hydrology and water resources management. He holds a BSc from the Technion and a PhD from MIT. He lectures, conducts research and consults in Israel and around the world to urban, regional, national and international water agencies. He is a senior consultant to the Israeli Water and Sewage Authority on matters of planning and policy and was previously consultant to Mekorot, the National Water Supply Company. He was Chairman of the Israeli Association of Hydrology, President of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences, Vice President and President of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, Member of the Executive Board of the International Council of Science. He is Chair of the Technical Advisory Committee of the UN World Water Assessment Programme led by UNESCO. Prof. Shamir is Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Foreign Member of the Spanish Academy of Science, recipient of the 2000 International Hydrology Prize and of the 2003 Julian Hinds Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers and recipient of the Life-Long Achievement Award of the Israeli Water Association.

Professor Shamir has served as President of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences, President of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics, and Member of the Executive Board of the International Council of Science. In 2013, he was inducted Fellow of the Environment and Water Resources Institute (EWRI) of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).

 

Charles Steinfield, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Media and Information, College of Communications Arts and Sciences, Michigan State

Charles Steinfield is a professor in the Department of Media and Information at Michigan State University, where he has held a faculty position for more than two decades. He holds a B.A. in Communication from Michigan State University, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Communication Theory and Research from the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California. Professor Steinfield is an award-winning author of six books and more than one hundred articles published in scholarly venues, and is a sought-after speaker at major international conferences. He is widely known for his research on computer-mediated communication in organizational settings, e-commerce, social media, and the role of information and communication technologies (ICT) in development. His current work on ICTs and development is funded by the United States Agency for International Development, and he serves at the ICT and Development lead for the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation at MSU. He also is currently studying enterprise social media use with funding from the National Science Foundation.

 

Nancy Sutley

Chief Sustainability and Economic Development Officer, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power

Nancy Sutley will works directly with the Water and Power systems, as well as the Chief Sustainability Officer in the Mayor’s Office, on energy efficiency, water conservation, economic development, and electrification of the transportation network, among other key issues. Ms. Sutley is the immediate past Chair of the White House Council on Environmental Quality where she served from 2009 - 2014, and previously served as Los Angeles Deputy Mayor for Energy and Environment, Board member of the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California and the California State Water Resources Control Board, energy advisor to Governor Gray Davis and Deputy Secretary for Policy and Intergovernmental Relations for the California Environmental Protection Agency.

 

Martin Wachs, Ph.D.

Distinguished Professor Emeritus, Urban Planning, Luskin School of Public Affairs, UCLA

Martin Wachs was a professor of civil and environmental engineering and professor of city and regional planning at the University of California, Berkeley, where he also served as director of the Institute of Transportation Studies. Prior to this, he spent 25 years at UCLA, where he served three terms as chairman of the Department of Urban Planning. He retired as senior principal researcher and director of the Transportation, Space and Technology Program at the RAND Corporation. Wachs is the author of 160 articles and four books on subjects related to relationships between transportation, land use, and air quality; transportation systems; and the use of performance measurement in transportation planning. His research addresses issues of equity in transportation policy, problems of crime in public transit systems, and the response of transportation systems to natural disasters, including earthquakes. His most recent work focuses on transportation finance in relation to planning and policy. He is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, two Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowships, a UCLA Alumni Association Distinguished Teaching Award, the Pyke Johnson Award for the best paper presented at an annual meeting of the Transportation Research Board (TRB), and the Carey Award for service to the TRB.

 

Walker Wells

Vice President of Programs, Director of the Green Urbanism Program, Global Green USA

Walker Wells is Vice President of Programs and Director of the Green Urbanism Program for Global Green USA, a national non-profit organization headquartered in Santa Monica. He works with cities, neighborhoods, and community development organizations across the country to further green building and sustainable development practices through technical guidance, stakeholder facilitation, and the development of innovative policies and programs. Mr. Wells is a 2013 Fulbright Fellow with the Royal Institute of the Environment and Sustainability, and co-author of the 2007 book Blueprint for Greening Affordable Housing. He is a certified urban planner, a LEED Accredited Professional and Green Rater, an appointed member of the State of California Green Building Code Advisory Committee, an invited contributor to Planetizen.com, and a lecturer at the Claremont Colleges and the UCLA Urban Planning Program. Mr. Wells holds Bachelor’s degrees in Sociology and Environmental Studies from the University of California, Santa Barbara and a Master’s of City and Regional Planning from the California Polytechnic University San Luis Obispo. He studied at Lund University and the Lund PolyTechnic Institute School of Architecture in Sweden. Prior to joining Global Green, Mr. Wells was a Senior Urban Designer with Guren Associates in Los Angeles, an Associate Planner with the City of Santa Monica, and an Urban Planner for the City of Malmo, Sweden.

 

Downtown Los Angeles Skyline (Photo: Will Hastings, cropped) CC BY-NC 2.0
Downtown Los Angeles Skyline (Photo: Will Hastings, cropped) CC BY-NC 2.0

Program Committee

Mark Gold, Associate Vice Chancellor for Environment and Sustainability, Coastal Center Director, and Adjunct Professor, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Peter Kareiva, Director, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Yoram Cohen, Director, UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies; Professor, UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

Tami Gavrieli, Director, Sustainability Research Center, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies and former Director of Strategic Planning, Tel Aviv Municipality

Stephanie Pincetl, Professor-in-Residence and Director, California Center for Sustainable Communities, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability

J. R. DeShazo, Professor of Public Policy, Urban Planning, and Civil and Environmental Engineering; Director, Luskin Center for Innovation, UCLA Luskin School of Public Policy

Valerie Brachya, Director, Environmental Policy Center, Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies and former Senior Deputy Director General for Policy and Planning, Israel Ministry of Environmental Protection

Eran Feitelson, Professor, Geography Department, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair, Professor of Finance, and Director, Richard S. Ziman Center for Real Estate at UCLA

Naomi Carmon, Professor Emerita, Architecture and Town Planning,Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Sheizaf Rafaeli, Director, Center for Internet Research, and Professor, Haifa University

Tel Aviv Skyline (Photo: Dmitry Pist, cropped)
Tel Aviv Skyline (Photo: Dmitry Pist, cropped)

Venue

UCLA DeNeve Commons Auditorium and Plaza Room
351 Charles E Young Drive West, Los Angeles, CA 90024

Driving and Parking Instructions (more detailed information will be sent after registration)
1. From the 405 freeway, exit Sunset Boulevard EAST.
2. Enter campus by turning RIGHT onto Westwood Plaza.
3. Make an IMMEDIATE RIGHT onto Charles E. Young Drive North.
4. Enter parking lot 7 by turning LEFT at the stoplight.
5. Parking attendants are available from 7:15am-10:15am.

Directions

Contact Us

UCLA

Maura Resnick
Deputy Director, UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies
mkresnick@international.ucla.edu
(310) 825-9646

Christian Rodriguez
Center Administrator, UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies
crrod@international.ucla.edu
(310) 825-9646

Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies

Inbar Gordon
Project Coordinator, Urban Sustainability
Sustainability Research Centre
inbar@jiis.org.il
Tel: 02-5630175 ext. 23

UCLA Campus (Photo: Kyle Alexander)
UCLA Campus (Photo: Kyle Alexander)

Registration

Registration Fees
General Admission: $35.00
Non-profit/University Faculty & Staff: $25.00
Students (with valid student I.D.) $  5.00

Prices include light continental breakfast, lunch and afternoon refreshments.

Pre-Registration is required.

 

Registration Closed

 

Feel free to call us at (310) 825-9646 Monday through Friday, 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM (PST) or email us at smartcities@international.ucla.edu if you have any questions or difficulties with the online registration system.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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